New Books in the CLRR!

We are pleased to announce that the full suite of books donated to the Colleen Lewis Reading Room by Jessica Bensley, Clyde Cave, Winston Edghill and Leslie Taylor have all arrived.

IMG_20141002_201517

Included in the delicious suite are the following:

Caribbean Political Thought: (i) Theories of the Post-Colonial State and (ii) the Colonial State to Caribbean Internationalisms and, (iii) Caribbean Cultural Thought: From Plantation to Diaspora – edited by Aaron Kamugisha and Yanique Hume – both lecturers in Cultural Studies at the University of the West Indies.

Global Studies: Mapping Contemporary Art and Culture edited by Hans Belting, Jacob Birken, Andrea Buddensieg and Peter Wiebel. This is the third volume in a series that is part of the “GAM – Global Art and the Museum” project, providing an overview of the institutional and ideological landscape of contemporary art and culture in a global context.

The Image of the Black in Western Art – The Twentieth Century: The Impact of Africa. V Part 1, edited by David Bindman and Henry Louis Gates, Jr. looks at the history of the representation of people of African descent.

The CLRR is open by appointment on Tuesday and Thursday. Please contact us at freshmilkbarbados@gmail.com to set up a time to visit the CLRR.

Thank you to the donors.

Offset Issue #1: The Man Who Travels With a Piece of Sugarcane – #CCF

Offset Issue #1

In late 17th century and early 18th century Japan, there was a famous Ronin swordsman by the name of Miyamoto Musashi. The term Ronin was normally applied to samurai who didn’t have a master, either because the master died or the warrior was in disgrace. In Offset Issue #1: The Man Who Travels with a Piece of Sugarcane (2014), the main character Kyle Harding is a little like a stick/sugar cane fighting Musashi—who happens to attend University in contemporary Barbados.

The above excerpt is from Kwame Slusher’s review of Offset Issue #1 by Tristan Roach and Delvin Howellthis week’s addition to the Fresh Milk Books Tumblr – the online space inviting interaction with our collection in the Colleen Lewis Reading Room.

For new Critical. Creative. Fresh reviews every week, look out for our #CCF Weekly posts and see the great material we have available at Fresh Milk!

The Art Of Loving Google #CCF

Recently, some friends and I kept joking about how the answer to everything can be found by Google. Typing: ‘How to code a website’, ‘How to make alfredo sauce’, ‘I fell and now my tail bone hurts’ and, with this review in mind, I Googled ‘how to love’.  A 30 step guide—with pictures—was one of the first solutions the search engine provided. Resisting the urge to roll my eyes too much, I browsed the guide. Step by step, I increasingly noticed similarities between this ‘how to love’ and The Art of Loving.

The Art of Loving is a small book about love written by Erich Fromm in the 1950s. A social philosopher and psychoanalyst, he discusses types and effects of love and goes so far as to identify ‘real love’ and even how to put it into action.

The above excerpt is from Versia Harris’ review of Erich Fromm’s The Art of Loving, this week’s addition to the Fresh Milk Books Tumblr – the online space inviting interaction with our collection in the Colleen Lewis Reading Room.

For new Critical. Creative. Fresh reviews every week, look out for our #CCF Weekly posts and see the great material we have available at Fresh Milk!

Sovereignty of the Imagination: Conversations III #CCF

Sovereignty of the Imagination

George Lamming’s Sovereignty of the Imagination: Conversations III is an interesting dialogue. It explores how European imperialism and colonialism has influenced the cultural identity of the Caribbean. Separated into the essaysSovereignty of the Imagination and Language and the Politics of Ethnicity, the novel addresses the way social institutions are founded in imperialism, and the way this shapes the social constructs of race, class, nationalism and popular ideas about language. It is this latter essay, and in particular Lamming’s discussion on the race relations between the Afro and Indo-Caribbean populations, which resonates with me the most.

The above excerpt is from Ronald Williams review of George Lamming’s Sovereignty of the Imagination: Conversations III, this week’s addition to the Fresh Milk Books Tumblr – the online space inviting interaction with our collection in the Colleen Lewis Reading Room.

For new Critical. Creative. Fresh reviews every week, look out for our #CCF Weekly posts and see the great material we have available at Fresh Milk!

Márquez’s Bolivar – #CCF

kwame ccf

The front cover of The General in His Labyrinth is a blueprint. Its red tiled corridor could be a path in the labyrinthine mental and physical journey of the novel’s main character—the 19th century figure who is known as ‘The Liberator’ of Latin America from Spanish colonialism—General Simon Bolivar.

This path runs through a series of arches that are decorated with tropical trees; two naked women sit in the curves of each arch. Multiple Bolivars in full military regalia can be seen pacing with their hands clasped behind their backs from one side of an arch to another, probably reflecting on his past accomplishments and failures. The Bolivar at the farthest end—at the vanishing point—seems to be attempting to walk backwards, towards the reader/viewer, as if considering a return to his former glory. I say ‘attempting’, because the shrinking of the protagonist seems to reflect Bolivar’s inevitable death. His return happens only through  his labyrinthine recollections of past victories and failures, of great friendships and betrayals, and his thirty-five passionate love affairs.

The above excerpt is from newest member of the FMB Team Kwame Slusher’s review of Gabriel García Márquez’s The General in His Labyrinththis week’s addition to the Fresh Milk Books Tumblr – the online space inviting interaction with our collection in the Colleen Lewis Reading Room.

For new Critical. Creative. Fresh reviews every week, look out for our #CCF Weekly posts and see the good reads we have available at Fresh Milk!